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Supporting the Oral Presentation: A Checklist for Providing Feedback to Student Presentations in Your Classroom

By |2022-05-23T14:28:57-05:00May 19th, 2022|Categories: Gifted & Talented, Leadership Development, Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Social Emotional Learning, Teaching Strategies, The Arts|Tags: , , , , |

Students will be tasked with showcasing and presenting their work in various ways throughout their educational careers. This could be activities like reciting poetry or text, presenting at a science fair, participating in debate, or presenting a final project within their content-area class. Typically, you might design your presentation rubrics to focus on what matters most in your course- mastery of the course content. Because presentations can be used as one assessment method for students to showcase mastery, you might be looking for depth of content knowledge, accuracy, or expertise in the content students are discussing and how well the presentation itself communicates the students' message. These components are critical for an effective student presentation. But the actual characteristics of an oral presentation should also not be overlooked. For students to truly be effective communicators and demonstrate their best work, they will also need to be effective public speakers. Monitoring a student's public speaking ability and providing feedback and guidance for improvement can help develop them into effective communicators that will accel above and beyond your academic requirements for a presentation.

Promote Positive Affirmations Between Students in your Classroom

By |2022-05-05T13:48:10-05:00May 5th, 2022|Categories: Classroom Management, Gifted & Talented, Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Social Emotional Learning, Special Education, Teaching Strategies|Tags: , , , , , |

In a classroom context, positive affirmations are phrases and acknowledgments of positive aspects of a child’s personality, effort, behavior, or other characteristics. When affirmations are present in your classroom daily, it helps to set a positive tone within your classroom environment and enriches children’s perceptions of themselves. You may be most familiar with positive affirmations as a way for students to acknowledge aspects of themselves and use them as a mantra to help them continue to behave in a certain way. For example: “I am kind. I am smart. I am a hard worker. I am a helper. I am a leader.” Recited often, individuals may begin to have a healthier outlook on life, their character, and what they are capable of. The point of positive affirmations is to acknowledge yourself and others from a place of positivity and not criticism. This helps create motivated and happy children who value themselves, their work, and their peers.

Strengthening Peer Reviews through Growth Mindset

By |2021-11-09T08:37:36-06:00November 19th, 2019|Categories: Classroom Management, Gifted & Talented, Social Emotional Learning, Teaching Strategies|Tags: , , , |

Getting the most from peer reviews in your classroom? Stretch your investment through Growth Mindset in 4 steps—or use these free resources—to boost the benefit for you and your students.

Inquiry Based Learning: What It Looks Like in a Classroom Setting

By |2021-11-09T12:05:29-06:00June 3rd, 2019|Categories: Gifted & Talented, Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Science Instruction, Teaching Strategies|Tags: , , , , , |

Have you heard of inquiry-based learning, but weren't really sure what it entailed? Have you tried to implement it in your classroom, but not sure if you’re hitting the mark? Read on to find out the difference between true inquiry and flawed inquiry.

Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER)

By |2021-11-09T15:40:06-06:00January 29th, 2019|Categories: Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Science Instruction, STEM & STEAM, Teaching Strategies, Writing Instruction|Tags: , , , |

Have you ever had students respond, “I don’t know. It just did,” when asked to analyze and interpret their classroom lab results? We all want our students to “think like a scientist,” but often they fall short in connecting the dots between the lab results and the science concepts. Claim-Evidence-Reasoning or CER is a writing strategy that can develop a student’s analytical thinking and argumentative writing skills to turn that “I don’t know” into “aha, so that’s why we got those results in the lab.”

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