Chat with us, powered by LiveChat
Contact Us Using Our Chat Widget Below|courses@modelteaching.com

Supporting the Oral Presentation: A Checklist for Providing Feedback to Student Presentations in Your Classroom

By |2022-05-23T14:28:57-05:00May 19th, 2022|Categories: Gifted & Talented, Leadership Development, Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Social Emotional Learning, Teaching Strategies, The Arts|Tags: , , , , |

Students will be tasked with showcasing and presenting their work in various ways throughout their educational careers. This could be activities like reciting poetry or text, presenting at a science fair, participating in debate, or presenting a final project within their content-area class. Typically, you might design your presentation rubrics to focus on what matters most in your course- mastery of the course content. Because presentations can be used as one assessment method for students to showcase mastery, you might be looking for depth of content knowledge, accuracy, or expertise in the content students are discussing and how well the presentation itself communicates the students' message. These components are critical for an effective student presentation. But the actual characteristics of an oral presentation should also not be overlooked. For students to truly be effective communicators and demonstrate their best work, they will also need to be effective public speakers. Monitoring a student's public speaking ability and providing feedback and guidance for improvement can help develop them into effective communicators that will accel above and beyond your academic requirements for a presentation.

How to Use the Frayer Model in Your Classroom

By |2022-05-11T12:03:29-05:00May 10th, 2022|Categories: English Language Learners (ELLs), Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Reading/ELA Instruction, Teaching Strategies, Writing Instruction|Tags: , , , , , |

The Frayer Model was designed as a graphic organizer to help students learn the meaning of new vocabulary words. The vocabulary word is placed in the center of the page, and the definition, a picture or characteristic, example, and non-example surround the word in separate boxes. This structure allows for a visual representation of the vocabulary word that students are attempting to learn.

Simultaneous Oral Spelling (SOS): A Simple Method to Support and Improve Spelling

By |2022-04-06T13:55:43-05:00April 6th, 2022|Categories: Reading/ELA Instruction, Special Education, Teaching Strategies, Uncategorized, Writing Instruction|Tags: , , , , , |

Multi-sensory structured teaching involves the use of visual (language we see), auditory (language we hear), and kinesthetic-tactile (language we feel) tools that can enhance student learning of language. When students struggle with a language-based skill, for example, children with dyslexia that may struggle with reading, teaching in multi-sensory ways can help improve a child’s skillset in certain areas. For students who struggle with spelling due to dyslexia, ADHD, an auditory or visual processing disability, or other unknown issues, multi-sensory approaches to teaching the phonological skills underlying spelling work can help improve student outcomes. This blog article will teach one method to help students improve their spelling, regardless of the cause of the spelling issue.

Building ELL-Friendly Writing Prompts

By |2022-02-14T16:07:26-06:00February 14th, 2022|Categories: English Language Learners (ELLs), Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Reading/ELA Instruction, Teaching Strategies, Writing Instruction|Tags: , , , , |

The writing process can be challenging for any student, but English Language Learners tend to need increased support and careful lesson planning by their teachers for the best success in class. English grammar differs greatly from grammar constructs of other languages, and some of our common writing structures, such as a topic sentence followed by supporting details for an organized paragraph, may be unfamiliar to them. ELL students also typically have a limited English vocabulary, making it challenging to write their thoughts. Children need to comprehend many components of the writing process, including the written prompt, the piece they are responding to, or other tasks and instructions. These challenges can lead to great frustration for some students, which can even manifest as a lack of motivation. This blog article will present some considerations for designing ELL-friendly writing prompts to help set your students up for success throughout the writing process.

Using Word Banks as a Simple Tool to Support ELL Vocabulary Understanding

By |2021-10-13T15:10:35-05:00October 13th, 2021|Categories: English Language Learners (ELLs), Reading/ELA Instruction, Teaching Strategies, Writing Instruction|Tags: , , , , |

This article provides you with one of many simple methods you can implement to help support ELL Vocabulary Understanding. By providing students with prompts and a word bank, you can help reinforce important vocabulary words within your content lesson to ensure you have multiple layers of support for your ELL students. This short article is an excerpt from our Simple ELL Vocabulary Strategies quick course, which provides additional ideas for vocabulary support.

Your Shopping Cart

Name Price
Buying for a team or group ? Select quantities on checkout page.
Go to Top