Contact Us Using Our Chat Widget Below|courses@modelteaching.com
Home » Education Articles » Special Education

The ABCs of Behavior

By |2021-04-27T10:22:24-05:00December 12th, 2020|Categories: Classroom Management, Special Education, Teaching Strategies|Tags: |

Have you found yourself spending too much time dealing with behavior issues in your classroom? Do you sometimes feel as if you have spent more time correcting a student’s behavior rather than teaching? If so, this article will discuss the ABCs and how to use them to take a deeper look at behavioral issues.

Three Daily Practices to Promote Social Emotional Learning in the Classroom

By |2021-04-27T10:25:07-05:00June 9th, 2020|Categories: Classroom Management, Social Emotional Learning, Special Education, Teaching Strategies|Tags: , , |

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is defined by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning as the process through which children and adults understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions. That definition can seem overwhelming to educators when they are told to include SEL in their curriculum. Read on to find out three simple strategies you can incorporate into your daily classroom routines that encourage the social-emotional growth of all your students.

Differentiation in the Classroom: Content, Process, or Product?

By |2021-04-27T10:27:38-05:00June 5th, 2020|Categories: Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Special Education, Teaching Strategies|Tags: , , , |

When we hear the term differentiation, we often think of helping students with learning difficulties by providing students the right support so that they can be successful at high levels in the classroom. This is the most common practice, but differentiation can mean so much more! Learn some common strategies for differentiating the content you teach, the process by which your students learn, and the products they complete to demonstrate their knowledge.

Station Teaching and Alternative Teaching: Two Effective Co-Teaching Instructional Models

By |2021-04-30T10:09:48-05:00July 26th, 2019|Categories: Classroom Management, Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Special Education, Teaching Strategies|Tags: , |

If you are fortunate enough to work in a co-teaching situation, we encourage you to try station teaching and/or alternative teaching as instructional models. Station teaching is perfect for when you want to implement a variety of learning activities, and alternative teaching is an excellent method of differentiating instruction for two groups working at different academic levels.

4 Engaging Strategies to Teach the Alphabet

By |2021-04-30T10:15:18-05:00March 19th, 2019|Categories: Lesson & Curriculum Planning, Reading/ELA Instruction, Special Education, Teaching Strategies, Writing Instruction|Tags: |

Identifying and writing the letters of the alphabet is a foundational step in every learner’s literacy knowledge. There are countless ways to practice these skills and it can be challenging to know which ones are most effective and engaging. We’ve explored hundreds of strategies and decided on our top 4 favorite ones. These engaging activities will give your young learners plenty of opportunities to grow their alphabet knowledge and practice identifying, writing, and using letters in a variety of ways.

Keep in mind as you read, we have also provided a number of great free resources below to help you teach your students the alphabet.  We will discuss each resource in this article, so please take a look at these tools as you read!  So, here we go!

Improving Parent Involvement With Consistent Communication Through Phone Calls

By |2020-01-05T22:47:34-06:00September 12th, 2017|Categories: Parent Involvement, Special Education|

STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING PARENT-TEACHER COMMUNICATION WITH A PHONE-CALL PLAN OF ACTION
Imagine This:  You have a student in your classroom that consistently cannot or does not meet classroom expectations.  You have tried implementing the right responses to her misbehaviors in class, and you have worked diligently to correct behavioral concerns so that she can be successful within your class.  You have referred her to an administrator, and you have called her parents a few times.  After your third phone call to her parents, her mother begins to defend her child’s behaviors, and comments that you never have anything nice to say about her child.  Or, maybe her mother is simply exasperated with her child and is communicating her own frustration about her child to you.  This negative response (often cultivated in families by phone calls bearing bad news) don’t do anything to support or help the child.

Your Shopping Cart

Name Price
Buying for a team or group ? Select quantities on checkout page.